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Migrating swan's - Scraps & Stitches
justmej
justmej
justmej
Migrating swan's
I saw something last night I have never seen before. What a wonderful site. We had about 40 swans fly over in the 'V' formation heading up north.
I have seen geese coming over in great flocks, but never swan's.
I am guessing they were coming in from Russia.



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Comments
caarianna From: caarianna Date: March 21st, 2009 04:27 pm (UTC) (Link)
Wow, what a magnificent sight that would be!
justmej From: justmej Date: March 22nd, 2009 09:51 am (UTC) (Link)
It really was something to see..
snailbones From: snailbones Date: March 21st, 2009 04:28 pm (UTC) (Link)



Wow! Beautiful! Don't they make the most amazing noise too?


justmej From: justmej Date: March 22nd, 2009 09:54 am (UTC) (Link)
They really do. But were pretty quite compared to geese.Seeing them like this was amazing.
gillyp From: gillyp Date: March 21st, 2009 08:52 pm (UTC) (Link)

I've never seen a migrating swan!

They tend to stick around all winter in these here parts.
justmej From: justmej Date: March 22nd, 2009 08:30 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: I've never seen a migrating swan!


We have swans that stay all year round but allot do migrate still. This story is from a few years back.

Swans migrate to nature reserve

If the weather deteriorates, more swans could be on their way
About 2,000 swans from the Arctic Circle have flown into a nature reserve in West Lancashire.
Managers at the Martin Mere Wildfowl and Wetlands Reserve near Burscough say the amount of birds flocking to the reserve is "unprecedented".

Figures have been high in previous winters but this year more of the migrating swans have come making it the second largest flock in the country.

Many of the Whooper swans make their winter time homes in East Anglia.

Breeding grounds

Experts say if the weather in East Anglia deteriorates, more swans could be on their way.

The 380-acre Martin Mere reserve regularly attracts Whooper and Bewick swans.

The swans fly thousands of kilometres each year, to and from their breeding grounds.

They make use of the summer in the Arctic tundra before flying south to spend the winter in relatively warmer climates.




From: maaaaa Date: March 21st, 2009 09:23 pm (UTC) (Link)
What a lovely picture. I live in a flyway for Canadian Geese and in the Fall they are overhead in the tens of thousands for about 6 weeks. Everyone now and then there'll be several specieis of crane mixed in and they're amazing to watch. I've never seen any swans, though.
justmej From: justmej Date: March 22nd, 2009 10:01 am (UTC) (Link)
I have always wanted to see the Canadian Geese like you get every year, maybe one year I will see them.
We really do have allot of Swans that stay around here all the time. At this time of year they get into the fields, and grase on the young oil seed rape plants. We can get 40-50 in a field at one time.
But I had never seen so many in flight like that the other night.
alyburns From: alyburns Date: March 22nd, 2009 03:30 am (UTC) (Link)

OMG!

That's BEEEEUTIFUL, J! So glad you shared it with us!
justmej From: justmej Date: March 22nd, 2009 10:04 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: OMG!

It really was something to see. We have them fly over all the time, one or two at a time. But I have never seen them in flight like that.
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